Vintage Wagon Planter Makes for a Floral Welcome

Liz from <a href="http://hoosierhomemade.com/" target="_blank">Hoosier Homemade</a> takes a vintage wagon and makes a rolling planter that pops in any yard. Liz from <a href="http://hoosierhomemade.com/" target="_blank">Hoosier Homemade</a> takes a vintage wagon and makes a rolling planter that pops in any yard.
Liz from Hoosier Homemade takes a vintage wagon and makes a yard-popping planter. #BrightIdeas

Liz from Hoosier Homemade takes a vintage wagon and makes a rolling planter that pops in any yard.

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If you have spent anytime reading Liz's blog - Hoosier Homemade, you'd know that she loves vintage, antique looking items. With vintage, comes wear and tear. Which is why the Vintage Wagon that she has used for many years as a planter to hold annual flowers has seen better days. With a few supplies from The Home Depot, and some handy work from her husband, Liz tackled the wagon redo to help freshen up the floral spirit of her front door.
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This is where she started. As you can see, the wood is falling apart around the edges, making it difficult for it to be screwed back together. And there was still old potting soil in the wagon from last year. She tried using her hot glue gun last year, and it worked for a short time, but in the end, the wagon just needed to be totally rebuilt.
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With all the soil crusted on, the base of the wagon was also in bad shape. Her plans included using some exterior grade construction adhesive to build an interior frame to attach the sides to the floor of the wagon. Some cleaning was called for before she and her husband could get started.
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They first scraped off the excess soil and removed the old screws.
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Then it was time to put Bounty® Paper Towels to the test and see if they could hold up under these tough conditions. Bounty® definitely did the job! After using only two sheets, the wagon was ready for the next step.
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Now it was time to build a frame for the wagon sides to be secured to because there was no way the original wood would hold together. They used an exterior grade construction adhesive made by Liquid Nails that is designed for sub-floors, applying a generous amount on the back of the 1*2's they picked up at The Home Depot.
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Then they screwed them into the base of the wagon. The sides were attached to uprights in the same fashion. Because she wanted to add flowers to the wagon and create a planter, Liz drilled holes in the bottom, creating yet another job for Bounty® Paper Towels to handle.
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Now the vintage wagon was ready for another year, bringing color and character to the front yard. See Liz's full tutorial on Hoosier Homemade.